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2 edition of Existentialist interpretations of the desire to be God: radical freedom in Sartre and Berdyaev. found in the catalog.

Existentialist interpretations of the desire to be God: radical freedom in Sartre and Berdyaev.

James Morse McLachlan

Existentialist interpretations of the desire to be God: radical freedom in Sartre and Berdyaev.

by James Morse McLachlan

  • 204 Want to read
  • 14 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English


The Physical Object
Pagination260 leaves
Number of Pages260
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14689268M

This study contends that existentialism is the perennial philosophy thus going against the assumption that it is a school of more recent provenance. Anthologies or introductory texts used begin with Kierkegaard (the so-called father of existentialism) and go on to emphasize Nietzsche, Sartre, and. “ the best existential analysis of the human condition leads directly into the problems of God and faith ” ~ Ernest Becker, The Denial of Death, , p. 68 “The desire for a strong faith is not the proof of a strong faith, rather the opposite.

() THE DESIRE TO BE GOD: Freedom and the Other in Sartre and Berdyaev. by James M. McLachlan, New York: P. Lang, , p. () PERSONALITY, SPIRIT AND ETHICS: The Ethics of Nicholas Berdyaev. by Howard A. Slaate, New York, P. Lang Publisher, Well, I think for Sartre, and for many modern people, philosophers or otherwise, God is dead. He's not part of the consciousness anymore. No longer present to the consciousness, there is only existence, sans meaning, sans essence. There is a void that must be filled, God cannot be resurrected in order to do it, and existentialists propose an.

of the key topics of Sartre's existential philosophy, but now from the perspective of an authentic existence that takes over responsibility for its 'unappropriable' freedom. For if the 'desire to be god' now func tions analogously to the 'horizon of everdayness' in Heidegger's existential analytic, then the break with this project (and its bad. Jean-Paul Sartre and the Possibility of Authentic Love [1]. Martine Heikens-Berenpas “There is always some madness in love. But there is always some reason in madness,” says Nietzsche when he talks about man’s ultimate search for authentic love.


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Existentialist interpretations of the desire to be God: radical freedom in Sartre and Berdyaev by James Morse McLachlan Download PDF EPUB FB2

Nikolai Berdyaev () – Spiritual Philosopher expelled by Lenin in as part of “The ” and a member of the Bratstvo sviatoi Sofii (Brotherhood of St.

Sophia). Of noble birth, Berdyaev began his career in Marxism (Legal Marxist) and, with Struve, Bulgakov, Frank and Tugan-Baronovsky, was one of the leading theoreticians for the Russian Social Democratic Party. Sartre argued in Being and Nothingness that God is incompatible with human freedom.

Berdyaev argues that God is not only compatible but necessary to freedom. This study reveals two ironies: Berdyaev's God is a more radical departure from traditional Western theism than Sartre's atheism.

And Berdyaev's idea of freedom presents the more radical Cited by: 5. Existentialism was a philosophy that I, as a young apologist, needed to answer in and for a number of years after.

It was in the air. Francis Schaeffer wrote and spoke much about the atheist worldviews of Albert Camus, Jean-Paul Sartre, and other existentialists.

Existentialism and Jean-Paul Sartre. Existentialist philosophers such as Albert Camus and Jean-Paul Sartre were well-known in their time for being involved in resistance, unforgiving of collaborationism and conformity, and for having an active interest in revolutionary movements.

When coupled with the fact that freedom is one of the most. Max Stirner. Anarchism had a proto-existentialist view mainly in the writings of German individualist anarchist Max his book The Ego and Its Own (), Stirner advocates concrete individual existence, or egoism, against most commonly accepted social institutions—including the state, property as a right, natural rights in general, and the very notion of society—which he.

Sartre argued in "Being and Nothingness" that God is incompatible with human freedom. Berdyaev argues that God is not only compatible but necessary to freedom. This study reveals two ironies: Berdyaev's God is a more radical departure from traditional Western theism than Sartre's atheism.

And Berdyaev's idea of freedom presents the more radical. The volume includes Sartre's lecture "Existentialism Is a Humanism" and his analysis of Camus's The Stranger, along with a discussion of these works by acclaimed Sartre biographer Annie Cohen.

The philosophy of Søren Kierkegaard has been a major influence in the development of 20th-century philosophy, especially existentialism and postmodernism. Søren Kierkegaard was a 19th-century Danish philosopher who has been labeled by many as the "Father of Existentialism", although there are some in the field who express doubt in labeling him an existentialist to begin with.

Sartre's theory of radical freedom is most strongly opposed by. Sartre believed that the desire to have eternal life promised for sure was an example of "bad faith." True.

Sartre had been a Nazi for a year, then renounced Hitler and escaped to Paris. Sartre's major book was entitled, simply: Being and Nothingness. True. The Journal of Speculative Philosophy () In her recently published book, The Bonds of Freedom, Kristina Arp finds in the work of Simone de Beauvoir grounds to put "existentialist.

Sartre believed that the desire to have eternal life promised for sure was an example of "bad faith." Sartre's theory of radical freedom is most strongly opposed by. Not: Sartre's major book was entitled, simply: Being and Nothingness.

True. Communist totalitarian socialist systems are the very nemesis of the radical freedom of Existentialism. The essential thing to Sartre was active commitment to a movement that defies the "system" and its conformist values. But to overthrow a system that upholds human rights and the freedom to be an Existentialist is irresponsible.

The Desire to be God: Freedom and the Other in Sartre and Berdyaev, New York: Peter Lang, Nucho, Fuad. Berdyaev’s Philosophy: The Existential Paradox of Freedom and Necessity, London: Victor Gollancz LTD, Pattison, George.

“Introduction: Reading Dostoevsky Religiously.” In Dostoevsky and the Christian Tradition, edited by George. Sartre is referring to the idea that existence is contextual. Coffee mugs don't exist in general and the abstract; they only exist in the particular and the concrete. This coffee mug in front of me exists, and the one in your imagination doesn't.

But “[t]here is no God,” in Sartre’s view, and, likewise, “no moral values, but, even if God existed,” as he clearly does for Orestes, “nothing would change,” for Sartre’s “key doctrine [is] man’s radical freedom,” Gillespie writes, and this is the one true source of metaphysical authority for Sartre (Gillespiep.

;Chapter 2 presented the thought of Sartre on the human and freedom. It was seen that he argues for a radical freedom and the deconstruction of the human who simply "begins to be" without having been created.

To uphold the primacy of freedom, he simply denies God. The human is pure consciousness seeking definition in a world of fixed stabilities.

In this provocative philosophical analysis, Jean-Paul Sartre refutes the idea that existentialism drains meaning from human life, by claiming that the philosophy instead gives man total freedom to achieve his own significance Sartre's Existentialism and Human Emotions is a stirring defense of existentialist thought, which argues that "existence precedes essence."/5().

Atheistic Existentialism Introduction Existentialism refers to a variety of philosophies and attitudes that developed primarily in Germany and France from the time of World War I to just after World War II.

Prominent in all forms of existentialism are the concepts of the personal existence of man, and his freedom and consequent responsibility for what. objective meaning. Sartre is right in that fallen humans desire to be independent of the one true God, and so labor vainly to be gods themselves.

This was the heart of the serpent’s temptation made to our first parents (Gen. –7; see also Ezek. –10). However, inasmuch as Sartre claims that humans are defined as the desire to be God. SK: But Sartre, God makes all the difference, since freedom without grounding in God is not freedom unto the good but a vertiginous and valueless randomness, as you yourself seem to recognize.

We choose wrongly even when we own up to our radical freedom. Yet before the face of God our freedom can be addressed with integrity. Just select the book you want to read about (I double-click, though I may not need to)--However what I see tells me that the first book you mention, "Existentialism Is A Humanism" is a shorter, more 'accessible' book referring to Sartre's work, with I'm sure, a lot of quotes and such, but not a full picture.

It may be all you want.In Being and Nothingness, Sartre rejects any and all forms of causal determinism – even the “psychological” determinism which finds the immediate causes of action and choices in the desire and beliefs of agents.

Sartre’s existential freedom, or so-called radical freedom, maintains that I (as a responsible agent) am not simply another. From the groundbreaking author of The Second Sex comes a radical argument for ethical responsibility and freedom. In this classic introduction to existentialist thought, French philosopher Simone de Beauvoir’s The Ethics of Ambiguity simultaneously pays homage to and grapples with her French contemporaries, philosophers Jean-Paul Sartre and Maurice Merleau-Ponty, by Reviews: